Friday, May 25, 2018

If you throw away your bicycle...

Recently my daughter (10) and I were able to participate in a true daddy/daughter bonding experience. We traveled 26 miles by bike for a full day outing. Neither of us are avid bikers, but we do take short trips from time to time around the neighborhood and town. It was by far the longest bike ride either of us had ever participated in, and it truly modified our perspective of what we are capable of accomplishing together.

There was another student on the trip trying to explain the trouble he was having while attempting to ride his bike. He was sharing with his teacher that this bike was new -- his parents had "thrown away" his bicycle a while back. He said he was not regularly riding it and it was not really working for him.  In preparation for the class bike trip, though, they purchased him a newer, bigger one.  However, in last-minute preparation for the trip, his bike was put together with handles and brakes facing in the wrong direction. The boy, both out of practice from riding in general, and just learning to ride his new ten-speed with rear-facing handles and brakes, struggled on the trip out of the gate. He needed support for the first mile before they simply exchanged his bike to allow him to participate in the ride.

A few educators have suggested to me over the year that they don't see a need for using technology for lots of tasks in the classroom. I have even heard, "Well, I don't use technology unless it is an activity at Modification or Redefinition levels on SAMR. Otherwise I have them put the tech away."

I am impressed with this dedication to understanding that technology is more useful in our classrooms at some times, and less valuable at others. I am impressed that we know there are higher leverage uses of technology and lower leverage uses. That shows incredible growth in our adoption of tech in our classrooms.

I am worried, though, that if the only times our students are using these tools productively in classrooms is when we have a high leverage Modification or Redefinition level lesson, we may fall into the same trap this young man fell into on the bike ride.  His bigger challenge was that he was out of practice. He didn't have a bike to practice on, even for short rides around the neighborhood. So on the day of the big outing, he faced the challenge of learning to use new equipment (his new bike), but he also faced the challenge of getting back into riding form. 

The same could be said for students who are asked to put away their iPads until the teacher is ready to use them for some big project. They now need to struggle with updates to apps, outdated operating systems, accounts that have signed off from lack of use. And then they also have to remember how to do some of the things they will need to do for the lesson in the classroom. Additionally, they are out of practice and will have to re-familiarize themselves with the device and the apps (including new updates to apps that may have changed the way the app works). While using technology is a lot like riding a bicycle, imagine if your bicycle was continuously updating itself in the garage while it was waiting for your next ride. Picking it up and riding without a refresher might be a bit of a challenge the next time you decide to head out on the road.

Remember, in Waukesha we do not believe that technology is ALWAYS the right tool for the job. We are not paperless, we are not tech only. But we also believe that technology will be a part of our students lives for everything they encounter moving forward. As a result, we need to have them continually honing their skills around PRODUCTIVE uses of technology. They do not get that opportunity to continually improve when we ask them to power down and continually put technology away.

So before you power down and put away those devices in your classroom, ask yourself: Is there enough value in what the students are doing with technology today that we can utilize it so students stay in shape with the skills they need to be productive with technology?


And if you want to see an amazing video about two important topics -- riding bikes and how we learn -- check out the video on riding the backward bike -- https://ed.ted.com/featured/bf2mRAfC#review.